for or against anti depressents

I’m on a really low dose of prozac. it doesnt do to much but i’ve tried everything out there with no success just bad side effects. sometimes i wonder if its worth taking anything at all. Like people in the 20s and 30s managed without them. Don’t you think that your in control of your thoughts and meds are a temporary fix. Just wondering what you think
Against. Meds like that mask the symptoms, while the problem still remains. You build tolerances, they raise your dose, till you max out, and have to switch meds. Then when ya stop, guess what, the problem is still there.

I use this analogy often…. If you break your leg, and the bone is sticking clear out of your skin…. would you wanna fix the leg, or only take pain meds so you don’t feel the pain? Obviously…. you fix whats causing the pain, not the pain itself. Pain is a symptom of a problem. Fix the problem, not the symptom. My 2 cents for what it’s worth.

Against. Meds like that mask the symptoms, while the problem still remains. You build tolerances, they raise your dose, till you max out, and have to switch meds. Then when ya stop, guess what, the problem is still there.

I use this analogy often…. If you break your leg, and the bone is sticking clear out of your skin…. would you wanna fix the leg, or only take pain meds so you don’t feel the pain? Obviously…. you fix whats causing the pain, not the pain itself. Pain is a symptom of a problem. Fix the problem, not the symptom. My 2 cents for what it’s worth.

There is no max out. They put a person on "cocktails"…several meds at time once the one pill routine doesn’t work anymore.

There is no max out?…. mmmk….. So, why would they need an additional pill if you cannot max out on one pill? Hmm… maybe to avoid the debilitating side effects of getting off the first pill?
Only as an absolute last resort, im in the same row as 2500 , a problem remains to be a problem till the end of time until you fix it,

problem solving > problem suppressors.
You’re just going to get a bunch of comments from people who aren’t qualified to talk about medication.

Unfortunately depending on the context of illness, we’re not always in control of our thoughts.

The best thing a person using medications for mental health can do is also enter therapy and visit their doctor regularly to work on improving mental health.

As far as people living well, that isn’t really the truth. The quality of life was much more difficult, the lifespan shorter, and pain and suffering related to mental health was taboo to discuss socially.

Medications will always have a place, but until therapy becomes more socially acceptable, and easier to aquire, people will turn to medications which are often cheaper to pay for with medical insurance than therapy. More insurance companies cover medications over therapy, and on average medications are cheaper than the standard 70-120 hourly fee for therapy, which must be continued for weeks, months or even years to improve certain mental health conditions.

Some medications must be increased over time, and so do not. For example I’m on Wellbutrin, but I’m also on Ativan. I use both in a chronic fashion, thus I’ve been on them for years.

The Wellbutrin doesn’t change, but the Ativan does. The body adapts over years to the Ativan, and eventually you reach a point where you have no choice but to begin going backwards to slowly get off it, then another medications must be used eventually.

Another important aspect of your analogy is that should a person break their leg, pain medications should in-fact be given to suppress symptoms in order to attempt to improve the person’s quality of life, while surgical, or manipulative techniques are used to stabilize, and aid the correct healing of the injury.

Thus, therapy in conjunction with medical care, as well as medication intervention are often just as important in some mental health cases as is pain medication to a physical injury.

The issue is quality of life, not attempting to mask symptoms, but people are often unaware of their options and what they should do because care providers often assume the patient should just know this logical sequence of care. The best care providers hold your hand when dealing with sending you to specialists and communicating in simple terms what they’re attempting to do to help you.

If you decide to not do your homework and you just go out and buy the first car you see, it’s hit or miss. You might buy a Honday Accord and end up with solid reliable transportation, or you might buy a 1986 Lebaron and end up breaking down constantly. It’s always your fault and your responsibility for the consequence of choosing or accepting to see bad doctors, even if you don’t know your options.

I seems unfair. I’ve been there. However that’s moving way offtopic, so getting back to the main point. Medications have their place for mental health, and in other cases they should not be used immediately.

I’ll quote myself metallic. Yeah, maybe the "pain meds" are OK while you’re having your "leg" fixed, but to me, the drugs in question for the OP are being used as a "magic pill" not something to help while he goes to therapy or counseling.
He hasn’t explained any other treatment he’s been on, so I haven’t assumed.

a problem remains to be a problem till the end of time until you fix it,

problem solving > problem suppressors.

i agree with this, but i think there are some rare cases where its needed, but doctors just give this stuff out like its candy.
I’m not in any way qualified to speak intelligently on the matter, but in my experience I’ve found that it’s not always the best way to go. I live with someone that takes a big drug cocktail for this sort of thing daily and from what I can see it does him no good. I’ve known him for a good 8 years now too so I know what he was like before. He sleeps until its dark out every day and when he actually is awake he just sits in front of his computer until he goes back to sleep.

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