Home Sick

I’ve been in Italy now for almost 3 months. I spent most of the time sick but did manage to see some new places. I can’t wait to get back to the U.S!

I’ve missed you around here! How’s everything with the little lady?
Italy! I hope you’re not overdoing it with all the siteseeing, you need to stay well my friend.

I’d be having the time of my life is I were there.

I was just thinking about you, glad you had a good time at least.

Italy is more of a 2-3 week visit place, honestly. Staying there for months on end can get kinda frustrating…
3 months and already homesick? Enjoy the opportunity. Not many people get the opportunity to live in another country for 3 months. Italy is a nice country. Once you’re back home, you look back and wish you had made more of the opportunity. Man up.
Thanks everyone. Yeah, I’ll be coming back, probably next year for a few more months. I’m coming home with some really exciting ways to hopefully get well. I’ve spent months here and my girlfriend has helped me study and try a lot of new things that I never would have done.

I’ve posted pictures on my myspace for everyone to see if anyone cares. My latests blogs also tell about my trip and things I’ve done.

Cool man….hope you feel better soon and welcome back to the good ole US of A.

I don’t mean a dick, but spending 3 months in Italy is actually a lot harder than it seems. I’d know because I’ve lived there on and off for the last 4 years, with one year-long stint, and several in the 4-8 month range. Doing something like that is so completely and totally different from a vacation, not only because it’s just so much longer, but also because it’s more real. When you’re on vacation, everything is really charming, and great, and wonderful, and you’ve got a return date. You know when you’ll be seeing your family/friends/SO. When you live somewhere for months on end, things start to get a little bit tougher, because everything becomes more real. The actual weight of the time you’re spending there starts to sink in (especially if you’re working), and naturally you start to miss the important people in your life. It also makes it tougher to deal with the frustrations of everyday life (and in Italy, there are plenty). My advice? Don’t do the whole ‘counting down the hours’ thing, because it’ll just make the hours seem that much longer. I do agree that you have to make the most of the opportunity, but the most important thing is to stay positive. If you start getting negative and thinking about how homesick you are, you won’t get much done at all, and you’ll end up depressed…
Just out of curiosity, which part of Italy?

I had a boss from Trieste. She goes apeshit after spending a month there. Nothing gets done within any time frame. Nothing. That’s why trash is STILL piled in the streets in suburban Naples after several months.

She moved to the states when she was 10 or so, so now she’s as American as apple pie. I travel a lot, I hate and love America… there’s really no place like home.

MB, I must have missed it, but why did you go there again?

I had a boss from Trieste. She goes apeshit after spending a month there. Nothing gets done within any time frame. Nothing. That’s why trash is STILL piled in the streets in suburban Naples after several months.

She moved to the states when she was 10 or so, so now she’s as American as apple pie. I travel a lot, I hate and love America… there’s really no place like home.

MB, I must have missed it, but why did you go there again?

Exactly. It’s impossible sometimes…

I don’t mean a dick, but spending 3 months in Italy is actually a lot harder than it seems. I’d know because I’ve lived there on and off for the last 4 years, with one year-long stint, and several in the 4-8 month range. Doing something like that is so completely and totally different from a vacation, not only because it’s just so much longer, but also because it’s more real. When you’re on vacation, everything is really charming, and great, and wonderful, and you’ve got a return date. You know when you’ll be seeing your family/friends/SO. When you live somewhere for months on end, things start to get a little bit tougher, because everything becomes more real. The actual weight of the time you’re spending there starts to sink in (especially if you’re working), and naturally you start to miss the important people in your life. It also makes it tougher to deal with the frustrations of everyday life (and in Italy, there are plenty). My advice? Don’t do the whole ‘counting down the hours’ thing, because it’ll just make the hours seem that much longer. I do agree that you have to make the most of the opportunity, but the most important thing is to stay positive. If you start getting negative and thinking about how homesick you are, you won’t get much done at all, and you’ll end up depressed…
Just out of curiosity, which part of Italy?

I spent 6 months in the Netherlands, have been to over 15 countries, and now, will be living in Japan for 3 years. Like I said, man up. It’s all about what you make of it. Then again, I’m not really one to get homesick. I love traveling. I’m speaking out of experience, dick

Hahah, we’re in a similar boat, I’ve been all over the world as well! I guess we just have different views on this kind of thing (although I do agree that you need to make the most of the opportunity!), but then again, Italy was the only place that I really felt that way about, hahah. Homesickness was something that I’ve learned to deal with over the years, but it took me a little while. Since I was 15 (so, for the last 5 years or so) I’ve been home for longer than two months TWICE, so I’ve had my share of experience with that, haha

Also, I have to admit that I’m jealous that you get to live in Japan!

Hahah, we’re in a similar boat, I’ve been all over the world as well! I guess we just have different views on this kind of thing (although I do agree that you need to make the most of the opportunity!), but then again, Italy was the only place that I really felt that way about, hahah. Homesickness was something that I’ve learned to deal with over the years, but it took me a little while. Since I was 15 (so, for the last 5 years or so) I’ve been home for longer than two months TWICE, so I’ve had my share of experience with that, haha

Also, I have to admit that I’m jealous that you get to live in Japan!

Metallic has the advantage that he is with his girlfriend. I came out to Japan 2 weeks ago. Can’t speak the language and don’t know a single person, but I’m loving it. I have to agree with you about Italy. I only visited Italy, and Rome was the only place that got to me. Can’t exactly put my finger on it. Maybe it was being Asian and traveling around with a blonde Russian girl. We got stares everywhere we went. Walk into a restaurant or store, and the whole place would stare at us. Got to be a bit unnerving. Thought I was going to get into fights, especially, on the trains, because guys would stare us down bad. So, I can’t really say what it would be like living in Rome. Didn’t get that in Florence or Venice, though. It’s strange how I’ve been to more countries than States back home. Nothing beats traveling. Gives you a whole different perspective about life and about the States. Even with all our problems, we really do live in a great country. Now, I can’t stand how people complain and whine about the smallest things back home. Things that are a privelidge (sp?), but people think are rights.

You’re also not disabled. Being away from my care providers my doctors, my friends — it’s terrifying, but I had to do it. I had to take a risk to feel alive. I’m glad you’ve had all those opportunities and lived them to the fullest.

It’s true, this country has a lot of awful things happening. It’s a lot like the United States politically now. The political leaders are puppets of the Mafia. They run everything here. You’ve seen "The Departed, Godfather, Good Fellas" — while the exact events obviously are fiction, the activities of The Sopranos, and these movies is exactly what these people are doing. Toxic waste has been dumped all over the streets, trash everywhere in South Italy. The country is in trouble, and facism is gradually returning.

Also, they don’t even acknowledge that Lyme Disease exists here, but a there are tons of people sick with it! And there is no one to treat them. It’s all over Europe too, and the UK, Sweden, everywhere.

She moved to the states when she was 10 or so, so now she’s as American as apple pie. I travel a lot, I hate and love America… there’s really no place like home.

I agree. I love and hate my home, but everywhere seems to have it’s good and no so good parts. Denmark is perhaps one of the few places that is nearly perfect right now. Good luck getting in though.

MB, I must have missed it, but why did you go there again?

I’m visiting my girlfriends family. Which is a whole other beast. Her father is sick with Lyme (I can tell), but refuses to get treated. He has all the psychiatric symptoms, the abdominal pain, joint problems, fatigue when awakening. Long story, but he loves tending to his garden, and I think he got it there. I caught a nymph tick crawling up my girlfriends leg while we were at a small gathering. It was the size of the period at the end of this sentence. I’m costantly watching for them, you know? They’re the primary carriers of the illness (s). Everyone flipped out when we saw it, and we left! They know this disease well.

I agree, it’s a great country. Too bad our health care system is shot. At least in Italy you can get all your medications and testing for free, but the testing isn’t even accurate for most things.

Too bad my condition is so controversial, the insurance companies won’t cover me, even though I have insurance. They claim that long time antibiotics don’t work for Chronic Lyme Disease, yet antibiotics have been the only thing that have worked in the 21 years that I’ve been trying to get help. I’ve done a lot of treatment, and only tetracycline and a few others have helped.

It’s the same in other countries too. They all follow the IDSA guidelines. The infectious Disease society of America. They were just investigated by the attorney general of connecticut for anti-trust violations. Basically any doctor who believed, based on the available scientific research, that Chronic Lyme Disease exists (Persistent infection), was not allowed to serve on the panel which formulated the guidelines.

Medical doctors and insurance companies use the guidelines to give or deny care!

The investigation concluded on May 1st, and here is what they said:

Attorney General Richard Blumenthal today announced that his antitrust investigation has uncovered serious flaws in the Infectious Diseases Society of America’s (IDSA) process for writing its 2006 Lyme disease guidelines and the IDSA has agreed to reassess them with the assistance of an outside arbiter.

  • The IDSA failed to conduct a conflicts of interest review for any of the panelists prior to their appointment to the 2006 Lyme disease guideline panel;
  • Subsequent disclosures demonstrate that several of the 2006 Lyme disease panelists had conflicts of interest;
  • The IDSA failed to follow its own procedures for appointing the 2006 panel chairman and members, enabling the chairman, who held a bias regarding the existence of chronic Lyme, to handpick a likeminded panel without scrutiny by or formal approval of the IDSA’s oversight committee;
  • The IDSA’s 2000 and 2006 Lyme disease panels refused to accept or meaningfully consider information regarding the existence of chronic Lyme disease, once removing a panelist from the 2000 panel who dissented from the group’s position on chronic Lyme disease to achieve "consensus";
  • The IDSA blocked appointment of scientists and physicians with divergent views on chronic Lyme who sought to serve on the 2006 guidelines panel by informing them that the panel was fully staffed, even though it was later expanded;
  • The IDSA portrayed another medical association’s Lyme disease guidelines as corroborating its own when it knew that the two panels shared several authors, including the chairmen of both groups, and were working on guidelines at the same time. In allowing its panelists to serve on both groups at the same time, IDSA violated its own conflicts of interest policy.

(1)Reference:

I realize I’m talking a lot about my situation and health here, and I hope it doesn’t bother anyone, but it’s had such a significant impact on my trip, and it’s also a reason I am homesick. I wouldn’t be homesick if I wasn’t stuck inside most of the time and I wouldn’t be stuck inside if these bastards weren’t breaking the law and keeping scientific research suppressed in order to profit financially.

So while stuck inside I’ve been writing letters to politicians over these issues with the illness, and trying to get bills passed to fund research to help solve the problem. Now I’m finding out the IDSA has been lobbying the man (Frank Pallone of NJ) and have him in their pockets. So he refuses to let the bill pass.

It’s a lot of stress having people standing in the way of your recovery, and having such a nice trip affected by that fact.

I absolutely agree. One of the biggest reasons I’ve taken this trip is because I am sick, very sick at times. I physically and neurologically/psychiatrically am affected directly by this health problem. I’ve been encouraged by family friends and my counselor to "consider" getting out of the house, to make a trip, so that I feel I’m living, that I’m seeing the world a little.

Being sick with Lyme is a lot like being in prison. You have your books, your three square meals (If you’re not vomitting them up), and you have a little place to exercise. Beyond that, you don’t like using the phone, light sensitivity and sound sensitivity, as well as "confusion" make going outside a huge activity, overwhelming in-fact.

So being here, has been a massive challenge. Treating my illness has also been hard. When on treatment, antibiotics primarily, I turn into a hermit, and I become a bastard for awhile until they kick in, which can take awhile. I can’t have "any" relationships and very minimal interaction with people during these periods. The only way I can stop this behavior is by stopping treatment.

Can you imagine living like that, and having to pick and choose when you treat, just so people won’t abandon you? Being in Italy has been hard for all those reasons.

I love that I had the balls to do this, and I did see a few things, but in total of 3 months, I’ve spent less than 2 weeks outside.

When you’re on vacation, everything is really charming, and great, and wonderful, and you’ve got a return date. You know when you’ll be seeing your family/friends/SO. When you live somewhere for months on end, things start to get a little bit tougher, because everything becomes more real. The actual weight of the time you’re spending there starts to sink in (especially if you’re working), and naturally you start to miss the important people in your life.

It’s true. And even though my life at home is just as mundane, so is being here. It’s "charm" wore off after a month and a half. If I was well, I’d have gone non-stop and seen everything. It’s a great country to visit, but like anywhere else, it becomes "the same" after awhile.

It also makes it tougher to deal with the frustrations of everyday life (and in Italy, there are plenty). My advice? Don’t do the whole ‘counting down the hours’ thing, because it’ll just make the hours seem that much longer. I do agree that you have to make the most of the opportunity, but the most important thing is to stay positive. If you start getting negative and thinking about how homesick you are, you won’t get much done at all, and you’ll end up depressed…

Thankfully I don’t do those things, but regardless still end up with the symptoms. I make the best of it, and the best of it is very limited and restricted. I accept that, but it’s made me more homesick because I’m confined a lot.

I want to start my antibiotics back up. I feel sicker now because I stopped, but I didn’t want to have to go back on them. There is nothing anyone can really advise or do for me — but just sharing this helps. It’s so sad to me that I have missed or had so many great opportunities only to watch them fritter away while I’m ill.

Just out of curiosity, which part of Italy?

I’m just south of Milan. I’ve been there, to Turine and Genoa. I wanted to go to Florence but I couldn’t physically handle staying there for a few nights, so we decided to wait until I return next year.

Sorry for all the complaining, but it really is hard.
^^ Sorry to hear about your condition . Had no idea. Hope everything works out.

It’s alright man. A lot of people here knew I was leaving on this trip and that this stuff was a major issue of concern to me. I just wanted to let everyone know that it was hard, but I still did it. I made it through it so far!

Can’t be anymore frustrating than being at work getting your intelligence insulted and wanting to slit your wrists

(No I am not really going to do that, but I am really fucking tired of some piddly shit going on )

Can’t be anymore frustrating than being at work getting your intelligence insulted and wanting to slit your wrists

(No I am not really going to do that, but I am really fucking tired of some piddly shit going on )

Your positive attitude is overwhelming.

Sorry to hear work is going so poorly for you.

It’s easy for Americans to complain about shit here but for a "first world country" Italy is more like a second tier developing country where nothing gets done right at all and crony capitalism is the soup de jour.

It’s a nice place to visit but any Italian with an education is taking off and heading elsewhere in the EU and abroad pretty quickly.
Sorry I dont give a shit if you are homesick or not you are in an opportunity I will never get and would kill for.

Your like the woman with a loaf of bread under each arm crying because she has no ham.
im glad to hear everything is alright. even though i dont know you i hope nothing but the best for you man! keep it up.
I’ve been hearing about the trash situation in Italy. Can you give a perspective about what is happening over there with the trash?!

Off topic, but I’m loving Japan more and more everyday. The women are absolutely gorgeous. I’ve never dated an Asian, so it’s going to be a new experience. I don’t think I’ll ever date a white woman again. You should see how damn short some of the skirts are that the Japanese women wear. They love to show off their legs, and their is no hint of cellulite. Must be something in the water back in the States that make women so fat and cellulite prone. 80% of the white women I see here are overweight. Must suck to be them to see all these gorgeous, fit Japanese women everywhere!!!!

I’ve been hearing about the trash situation in Italy. Can you give a perspective about what is happening over there with the trash?!

Off topic, but I’m loving Japan more and more everyday. The women are absolutely gorgeous. I’ve never dated an Asian, so it’s going to be a new experience. I don’t think I’ll ever date a white woman again. You should see how damn short some of the skirts are that the Japanese women wear. They love to show off their legs, and their is no hint of cellulite. Must be something in the water back in the States that make women so fat and cellulite prone. 80% of the white women I see here are overweight. Must suck to be them to see all these gorgeous, fit Japanese women everywhere!!!!

wait till you get to know them.. you’ll wanna gouge your ears and brain.

Trust me on this. I’ve been there a bunch of times, dated j-girls, best friend is out in yokohama and his gf was a nut case…. hopefully their dad will approve of them dating a white devil.

Your positive attitude is overwhelming.

Sorry to hear work is going so poorly for you.

It’s all good. I have come to the conclusion some are unhappy with themselves so they are just trying to make me unhappy. Too bad. I give NO apology for being satisfied with myself, my life, or any venture I choose to take on.

Why do you want to come back to Springfield anyways,

Enjoy yourself!

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